Design Against Crime Publications


Main Publications

Research Briefings
Published Papers


Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design
  A Design Resource for designers to get smart quick about bag theft, pickpocketing and street crime.
To order copies of In the Bag CD-Rom, please contact the Crime Reduction College at:
www.crimereduction.org.uk
 
February 2001
  Sheffield Hallam University and University of Salford
  How can design contribute to crime reduction in the retail sector?
In what ways can independent retailers learn and apply lessons from multiples on designing against crime?
What design strategies can be applied by the retail sector?

Design Against Crime
April 2000
  University of Cambridge, Sheffield Hallam University and University of Salford

View file (1,177k)
designagainstcrimereport.pdf

  This report describes research carried out to explore the use of design best practice to reduce crime, in response to a brief set by the Design Council and the Home Office. Several Home Office reports have identified design as a factor which can influence crime levels, but it is a factor which is rarely considered from the outset of the design process. This research forms part of the Design Against Crime initiative, within the Crime Reduction Programme, and sets out to assess the current awareness of crime reduction within industry, and amongst designers and design decision makers in the new product development process. Factors which constrain and facilitate design against crime are identified, leading to recommendations to increase the contribution of design to crime reduction.
Design Against Crime: Research Briefings
The Design Policy Partnership, together with the Judge Institute of Management Studies at the University of Cambridge, undertook a major research study for the Home Office and the Department of Trade & Industry which provided the foundation for our current initiatives.

From the 300 page report (see above "Design Against Crime") we have extracted key chapters in the form of Research Briefings that you can download. Together they provide essential reference material on design against crime.


View file (232k)
briefing 1.pdf
  Design Against Crime in Context - This Research Briefing provides summaries and discussion of crime statistics, details contemporary approaches to crime prevention, and discusses how to develop and implement effective crime prevention strategies.
View file (589k)
briefing 2.pdf
  Design Against Crime in Practice - This Research Briefing provides the findings of a survey of 40 leading UK design consultancies, examining the integration of crime issues in their work. It also provides detailed examples of best practice in the fields of product design, communication systems, automotive design, packaging design, environmental design, public transport design, retail design and new media design. Interviews with some of Britain's most prominent designers such as Richards Seymour and Malcolm Garret are drawn upon in the Briefing.

View file (249k) briefing 3.pdf

  Design Against Crime in Education - This Research Briefing reports on a survey of 79 design degree courses in the UK, examining the incidence of project work and other educational practices that address crime within the design curriculum. We look at examples across visual communications, fashion design, industrial design and other disciplines. Detailed examples are provided.


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Design Against Crime: Published Papers

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Design as a tool for social policy: The case of ‘Design Against Crime’
Mike Press, Rachel Cooper , Rosie Erol
  The Fourth European Academy of Design Conference
Aveiro Portugal April 2001

View file (165k)
dacsocialpolicy.pdf

  Synopsis

Crime and crime reduction currently receive little attention in design practice, management or education. However, informed design can be used effectively as a tool for reducing crime through designing in crime reduction measures during initial stages of the development process as described by Ekblom (1995, 1997, 1999a&b) and Ekblom and Tilley (1998). This paper focuses on the current extent of inclusion of crime reduction measures within design practice in the United Kingdom, and draws out implications for practitioners, managers and policy makers. While some examples of good practice have been identified, we argue that the knowledge system to pursue it further requires considerable definition. Design against crime bridges both commercial objectives and those of public policy. Drawing on research for a British Government inquiry, this paper identifies issues for consideration by relevant stakeholders.
While some examples of good practice have been identified, we argue that the knowledge system to pursue it further requires considerable definition. Design against crime bridges both commercial objectives and those of public policy. Drawing on research for a British Government inquiry, this paper identifies issues for consideration by relevant stakeholders.
Design Against Crime – Awareness in Design Education
Mike Press, Rosie Erol, Rachel Cooper and Mike Thomas
   

View file (148k) dacdesigneducation.pdf

  Abstract

Whilst various social issues, such as ecological concerns, ageing and disability have received increasing attention within the design curriculum over recent years, crime and crime reduction issues have yet to be addressed to a similar extent. Informed design can be used effectively as a tool for reducing crime associated with environments, products and services through designing in crime reduction measures during the initial stages of the design process. This paper reports on research carried out as part of the Government’s Crime Reduction Programme, looking at the topic of design against crime, assessing current awareness of crime amongst professional and student designers, and identifying methods to bring crime reduction more prominently into the design forum.
The current awareness and inclusion of crime reduction in design education was explored by means of a questionnaire circulated to design course leaders, with follow-up in-depth interviews with key respondents. From the research gathered, ideas and recommendations are presented as to how crime reduction can be introduced as an integral part of design education.

Design Against Crime : Design leadership in the development of emotional values
Caroline L. Davey, Rachel Cooper, Mike Press.
Andrew B. Wootton,
Eric Olson
  Presented at the Design Management Institute Conference
Boston, June 2002

View file (760k)
DACemotionalvalues.pdf

  Abstract

Focusing on the recent UK initiative Design Against Crime, this paper illustrates how organisations can utilise design to develop practical business approaches to social responsibility and thereby respond to both emotional and social values.

We draw on thirty detailed design against crime case studies undertaken in the UK, Sweden, South Korea and the USA. Although focusing on the best practice methods being employed in design against crime, the cases also reveal strategies, resources and processes enabling professional designers to contribute to crime prevention and illustrates how organisations have used design against crime to engage with the ‘emotional values’ of consumers and provide commercial benefit.

The case studies reveal that designers respond effectively to briefs, where addressing crime is seen as a method of providing competitive advantage for the client, protecting brand image or reducing costs arising from retail theft. They also have a role to play in creating better environments and regenerating deprived areas.
A concluding discussion develops a new perspective of socially responsible design, embracing social inclusion, crime prevention and other key areas of public policy.
 
Design Against Crime: Defining New Design Knowledge Requirements
Mike Press, Rosie Erol, Rachel Cooper and Mike Thomas
  Presented at the Design Management Institute Conference
Frankfurt November 2000

View file (234k)
dacknowledgerequirements.pdf

  Abstract

Crime and crime reduction currently receive little attention in design practice, management or education. However, informed design can be used effectively as a tool for reducing crime through designing in crime reduction measures during initial stages of the development process as described by Ekblom (1995, 1997, 1999a&b) and Ekblom and Tilley (1998). This paper focuses on the current extent of inclusion of crime reduction measures within design practice in the United Kingdom, and draws out implications for practitioners, managers and policy makers. While some examples of good practice have been identified, we argue that the knowledge system to pursue it further requires considerable definition. Design against crime bridges both commercial objectives and those of public policy. Drawing on research for a British Government inquiry, this paper identifies issues for consideration by relevant stakeholders.



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